. Conversations at the Edge (CATE)

Spring 2021 Season Recap

Posted by | dmwaur | Posted on | May 12, 2021

Thank you for joining us for the Spring 2021 season of Conversations at the Edge! 

We are so grateful for the artists and scholars who shared their work with us and for our presenting partners, including the School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s (SAIC) Visiting Artists Program, the Open Practice Committee in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of Chicago, SAIC’s Video Data Bank, and the Gene Siskel Film Center.

Wendy Clarke, One On One: Arnold and Ahneva. Courtesy of the artist and the Video Data Bank.

Carolyn Lazard, A Recipe for Disaster, 2017. Courtesy of the artist

Madeleine Hunt – Ehrlich, Spit on the Broom, 2019. Courtesy of the artist

Ian Cheng, Emissary Forks at Perfection (still), live simulation and story, infinite duration, 2015-2016. Courtesy of the artist, Pilar Corrias, London and Gladstone Gallery, New York

Wong Ping, Jungle of Desire, 2016. Wong Ping. Courtesy the artist and Edouard Malingue Gallery, Hong Kong _ Shanghai; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York /Los Angeles

Announcing Spring 2021

Posted by | dmwaur | Posted on | January 18, 2021

We’re excited to announce the Spring 2021 season!

Screenings and conversations begin February 8 in the Gene Siskel Film Center’s virtual cinema. Join us for programs with Wendy Clarke (Feb 11),  Dustin Gibson, Robert McRuer, Liza Sylvestre, and Minh Nguyen (Feb 25),  Madeleine Hunt – Ehrlich (Mar 25), Ian Cheng (Apr 6), and Wong Ping (Apr 15). Visit www.saic.edu/cate for season details.

Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich, Spit on the Broom, 2019. Courtesy of the artist

Fall 2020 Season Recap

Posted by | dmwaur | Posted on | November 15, 2020

For our Fall 2020 program, we brought together a group of artists and scholars including Alison O’Daniel (Oct 1), American Artist (Oct 8), Delinda Collier (Oct 15), Ursula Biemann (Oct 22), Auriea and Michaël Samyn (Oct 28). 

These vibrant conversations and related screenings took place in the Gene Siskel Film Center‘s virtual cinema. We’re grateful for our presenting partners, including SAIC’s Video Data Bank and the  Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago.

Thank you for joining us!

Alison O’Daniel, still from The Tuba Thieves, 2013 – ongoing. Image courtesy of the artist.

American Artist, Blue Life Seminar, 2019. Courtesy of the artist

Delinda Collier, Media Primitivism (Duke 2020)

Ursula Biemann and Paulo Tavares, Forest Law, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and SAIC’s Video Data Bank

Auriea Harvey and Michaël Samyn, The Endless Forest, 2005-ongoing. Courtesy of the artists

Fall 2020 Season Announcement

Posted by | dmwaur | Posted on | August 20, 2020

We’re pleased to announce the Fall 2020 season of Conversations at the Edge! Throughout the season, we’ll be hosting virtual artist talks and events alongside on-demand screenings. Join us for programs with Alison O’Daniel (Oct 1), American Artist (Oct 8), Delinda Collier (Oct 15), Ursula Biemann (Oct 22), and Auriea and Michaël Samyn (Oct 28).  

All programs are free, captioned, and take place in the Gene Siskel Film Center’s virtual cinema. Full details at www.saic.edu/cate.

Alison O’Daniel, The Tuba Thieves (2013 – ongoing). Courtesy of the artist

Remainder of Spring 2020 – Postponed

Posted by | mnguyen6 | Posted on | March 26, 2020

We regret to announce that the remainder of Conversations at the Edge‘s Spring 2020 season has been postponed for a later date. This includes An Evening with Ian ChengThis Set of Actions is a MirrorWong Ping: Digital FablesMcKenzie Wark and Legacy Russell: Culture That Loves Us. In accordance with the latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), SAIC has suspended all on-campus events, exhibitions, and programming. For more information please visit saic.edu/alerts.

March 12 – Beatrice Gibson: Two Sisters – POSTPONED

Posted by | mnguyen6 | Posted on | March 9, 2020

Beatrice Gibson in person

3/12- Beatrice Gibson: Two Sisters

In response to the CDC’s guidance on COVID-19, the 30th annual Onion City Experimental Film and Video Festival, has been postponed. Beatrice Gibson: Two Sisters has been cancelled and will be rescheduled at a later date.

Incorporating experimental music, poetry, and improvisation, the award-winning films of London-based artist Beatrice Gibson are shape-shifting explorations of social and political turmoil. In two powerful, deeply connected works—I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead (2018), which takes its title from a poem by CAConrad, and Deux soeurs qui ne sont pas soeurs (Two Sisters Who Are Not Sisters) (2019), based on a screenplay by Gertrude Stein—Gibson defines the nature of motherhood and community in an age of contemporary anxiety. Weaving together images of joy and horror with readings by Conrad, Eileen Myles, Alice Notley, filmmakers Ana Vaz and Basma Alsharif, as well as friends and family, Gibson builds an archive of stories, at once triumphant and traumatic, cynical and optimistic, toward a collective future.

2018–19, France/United Kingdom, DCP, ca 50 minutes followed by discussion. 

Presented in partnership with the Onion City Experimental Film and Video Festival, a project of Chicago Filmmakers.

Beatrice Gibson is an artist and filmmaker based in London. In 2019 she had solo exhibitions at Camden Arts Centre in London; Bergen Kunsthall in Norway; and Mercer Union in Toronto. She has twice won the Tiger Award for Best Short Film at the International Film Festival Rotterdam, Netherlands (2009/13). In 2015 she won the 17th Baloise Art Prize at Art Basel, Switzerland, and more recently was the recipient of the Marian McMahon Akimbo Award at the 2019 Images Festival in Toronto. Her latest film premiered at Quinzaine des Réalisateurs (Directors’ Fortnight), Cannes Film Festival 2019.

March 5 – Mariah Garnett: Trouble

Posted by | mnguyen6 | Posted on | March 3, 2020

Mariah Garnett in person

Mariah Garnett, still from Trouble, 2019. Courtesy of the artist.

In the early 1970s, Mariah Garnett’s father fled Northern Ireland after being the subject of a BBC documentary about relationships that crossed the country’s violent religious and political divide. Four decades later, the Los Angeles-based artist and filmmaker returned to her father’s native Belfast, immersing herself in the city’s sectarian upheavals to make her own film about his early life. Named one of Sight & Sound’s best films of 2019, Trouble mixes archival footage, contemporary interviews, and a series of extraordinary performances in which Garnett plays her father, reenacting both the BBC documentary and his present-day reflections on the period. Through its multifaceted form, the film depicts the complexities of identity and the echoing effects of personal and historical trauma.

2019, United Kingdom/United States, DCP, 83 minutes followed by discussion.

Mariah Garnett mixes documentary, narrative, and experimental filmmaking practices to make work that deconstructs the conventional hierarchy between filmmaker and subject which has historically represented the purview of directors who are economically, racially, and gender privileged. Her work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery; Metropolitan Arts Centre, Belfast, UK; ltd los angeles; and Louis B. James, New York. Screenings and other exhibitions include the New Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; REDCAT, Los Angeles; BFI Southbank, London; New York Film Festival; Ann Arbor Film Festival, Michigan; and Made in L.A. 2014, the Hammer Museum biennial. She has received awards from the Rema Hort Mann Foundation (2015), California Community Fund (2014), Artadia Los Angeles (2016), and is currently a Guggenheim Fellow in film/video (2019).

Feb 27 – Linda Mary Montano: Laughing, Crying, Living Art

Posted by | mnguyen6 | Posted on | February 24, 2020

Linda Mary Montano in person

Linda Mary Montano, still from I’m Dying – My Last Performance, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and SAIC’s Video Data Bank.

Linda Mary Montano is renowned for videos and endurance-based performances that dissolve the boundaries between art and life. In works like Art/Life One Year Performance 1983–1984, a collaboration with Tehching Hsieh, she spent a year bound to the artist by an eight-foot rope; in 14 Years of Living Art (1984–98), she wore monochromatic clothing, devoted herself to meditative practice, and provided monthly “Art/Life Counseling” at the New Museum in New York (1984–91). Her transformative videos draw upon her biography, from the murder of her ex-husband in the powerfully cathartic Mitchell’s Death (1977) to the humor of the everyday. For this special evening, Montano performatively discusses her body of work, presents a selection of videos, and guides the audience through an interactive healing modality that alternates between laughing and crying, embodying the fundamentally empathic nature of her practice.

1977–2019, United States, digital video and live performance, ca 90 minutes followed by discussion.

With a background in sculpture, Zen Buddhism, and Catholicism, Linda Mary Montano turned to performance and video in the 1970s, establishing herself with endurance performances like Handcuff (1973 with Tom Marioni), and as well as a series of performance videos. From 1984 onwards, she embarked on two seven-year projects, titled 14 Years of Living Art, each conceived around the seven chakras. In 1998, she opened the Kingston Art/Life Institute and in 2005, she opened the Saugerties Art/Life Institute and Transfiguration Hospital to teach others her approach to merging art and life. Recent exhibitions include Linda Mary Montano: Always Creative, SITE: Santa Fe, New Mexico (2003); WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and MoMA PS1, New York; and The Third Mind: American Artists Contemplate Asia: 1860–1989, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. She is the author of seven books, including Letters from Linda M. Montano, (Routledge, 2005) and Performance Artists Talking in the Eighties (University of California Press, 2000).

Feb 22 – South by Southeast

Posted by | mnguyen6 | Posted on | February 20, 2020

Curator Greg de Cuir Jr. in person

Julia Lazarkova, still from Reversal of Essence, 2019. Courtesy of the artist.

While the countries in southern and eastern Europe share common histories and cultures, they have alternately been classified as Balkan and Mediterranean, as capitalist and socialist, as Western and non-Western, and as European and non-European. South by Southeast convenes a wide range of artistic works, many of which are screening for the first time in the United States, to deconstruct both geopolitical and aesthetic boundaries while mapping out a new conception of Europe. Originally established by Belgrade-based curator Greg de Cuir Jr. as an annual program of the Alternative Film/Video Festival in Belgrade, this edition features works produced for cinemas, galleries, and the internet by Damir Čučić, Armando Lulaj, Igor Simić, Peter Lichter, Julia Lazarkova, Diana Vidrascu, belit sağ, and Igor Bošnjak.

2017–19, multiple directors, multiple countries, multiple formats, ca 60 minutes followed by discussion.

Greg de Cuir Jr. is an independent curator, writer, and translator who lives and works in Belgrade, Serbia. Curatorial projects include the Black Light retrospective at the 72nd Locarno Film Festival, Switzerland (2019); Kevin Jerome EversonThe Abstract Ideal at the Museum of Contemporary Art Vojvodina in Novi Sad, Serbia (2019); 21st Century Žilnik at Close-Up Film Centre and LUX in London; the 64th annual Robert Flaherty Film Seminar in Hamilton, New York (with Kevin Jerome Everson, 2018); Affinities, or The Weight of Cinema (with Kevin Jerome Everson) at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2018), among many others. De Cuir is managing editor of the journal NECSUS (Amsterdam University Press), editor of the Eastern European Screen Cultures book series (Amsterdam University Press), and member of the editorial board of the Experimental Film and Artists’ Moving Image book series (Palgrave Macmillan). His essays have been published in CineasteJump Cut: A Review of Contemporary Media, Millennium Film Journal, ARTMargins, and Politika, among others. Since 2008 he has worked as selector for Alternative Film/Video Festival in Belgrade. 

 

Feb 20 – Avant-Noir

Posted by | mnguyen6 | Posted on | February 17, 2020

Curator Greg de Cuir Jr. and artist Edgar Arceneaux in person

Baloji, still from Zombies, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Sudu Connexion.

Conceived by Belgrade-based curator Greg de Cuir Jr. as an “intervention into the status quo,” Avant-Noir brings together contemporary films and videos by international artists of African descent to showcase visual representations of Black cultures in their many complexities. Part of a much larger project of iterative screenings and exhibitions, this special edition spotlights works from the last two years. Baloji’s stunning Zombies (2019) is both an Afrofuturist music video and satire of digital consumer culture. Ayo Akingbade’s poetic A is for Artist (2018) charts the artist’s growing political consciousness. Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich’s A Quality of Light (2019) is an Afrosurrealist portrait of the artist’s composer grandmother. Edgar Arceneaux’s Until, Until, Until… (2017–18) probes the history of African American representation on stage and screen through the bifocal lens of Broadway actor Ben Vereen and vaudeville star Bert Williams, America’s first mainstream Black entertainer.

2017–19, multiple directors, multiple countries, multiple formats, ca 90 minutes followed by discussion.

Greg de Cuir Jr. is an independent curator, writer, and translator who lives and works in Belgrade, Serbia. Curatorial projects include the Black Light retrospective at the 72nd Locarno Film Festival, Switzerland (2019); Kevin Jerome EversonThe Abstract Ideal at the Museum of Contemporary Art Vojvodina in Novi Sad, Serbia (2019); 21st Century Žilnik at Close-Up Film Centre and LUX in London; the 64th annual Robert Flaherty Film Seminar in Hamilton, New York (with Kevin Jerome Everson, 2018); Affinities, or The Weight of Cinema (with Kevin Jerome Everson) at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2018), among many others. De Cuir is managing editor of the journal NECSUS (Amsterdam University Press), editor of the Eastern European Screen Cultures book series (Amsterdam University Press), and member of the editorial board of the Experimental Film and Artists’ Moving Image book series (Palgrave Macmillan). His essays have been published in CineasteJump Cut: A Review of Contemporary Media, Millennium Film Journal, ARTMargins, and Politika, among others. Since 2008 he has worked as selector for Alternative Film/Video Festival in Belgrade. 

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    About

    Conversations at the Edge is a weekly series of screenings, performances, and talks by groundbreaking media artists.

     

    CATE is organized by SAIC's Department of Film, Video, New Media, and Animation in collaboration with the Gene Siskel Film Center and SAIC's Video Data Bank, Conversations at the Edge is a dynamic weekly series of screenings, performances, and talks by groundbreaking media artists.

     

    Programs take place Thursdays at 6pm at the Gene Siskel Film Center (164 N. State / Chicago, IL / 312.846.2600), unless otherwise noted.



     

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