. Conversations at the Edge (CATE)

October 22-Lorna Mills: Ways of Something

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | October 16, 2015

Thursday, October 22 | This week new media based artist Lorna Mills will join us for a screening and discussion! 

Ways of Something is Lorna Mills’s astonishing update of John Berger’s seminal BBC program Ways of Seeing (1972). Featuring the work of 114 digital and web artists from around the world, the project consists of a series of one-minute videos produced in response to Berger’s original insights on art and society. The result, a delirious and revelatory collection of 3D renderings, GIFs, webcam performances, appropriated media, desktop preparations, and websites, describes the cacophonous conditions of art making after the Internet. Episodes 1 and 2 screen at 6:00 p.m; episodes 3 and 4 screen at 7:45 p.m. Each screening is introduced by Mills and followed by a roundtable with artists featured in the project.

6:00 p.m.
Ways of Something, Episodes 1 and 2
2014, multiple directors, multiple countries, HD video, ca 60 min + discussion

These episodes contemplate the role of art in the age of infinite reproducibility and the “male gaze” in the age of avatars, social media, and digital manipulation. Featuring the work of Daniel Temkin, Rollin Leonard, Sara Ludy, Rhett Jones,Jaakko Pallasvuo, Dafna Ganani, Jennifer Chan, Rea McNamara, Theodore Darst, Matthew Williamson, Hector Llanquin, Christina Entcheva, V5MT, Marisa Olson, Joe McKay, Carla Gannis, Nicholas O’Brien, Eva Papamargariti, Rosa Menkman, Kristin Lucas, Jeremy Bailey & Kristen D. Schaffer, Giselle Zatonyl, Paul Wong, Alfredo Salazar-Caro, Sally McKay, RM Vaughan & Keith Cole & Jared Mitchell, Andrew Benson, Christian Petersen, Faith Holland, Jennifer McMackon.  Kevin Heckart, Geraldine Juárez, Gaby Cepeda, Angela Washko, Emilie Gervais, LaTurbo Avedon, Lyla Rye, Mattie Hillock, Antonio Roberts, Georges Jacotey, Daniel Rourke, Sandra Rechico & Annie Onyi Cheung, Yoshi Sodeoka, Alma Alloro Germany, LoVid, Andrea Crespo, Ad Minoliti, Arjun Ram Srivatsa, Carrie Gates, Isabella Streffen, Esteban Ottaso, Silke Zil Kuhar ZIL & ZOY, Hyo Myoung Kim, Jesse Darling, Tristan Stevens, Erica Lapadat-Janzen, Claudia Hart, and Anthony Antonellis.

7:45 p.m.
Ways of Something, Episodes 3 and 4
2014–15, multiple directors, multiple countries, HD video, ca 60 min + discussion

These episodes consider the ways art is used to express status and its role in the aspirational world-making of advertising. Featuring the works of Carine Santi-Weil, Nicolas Sassoon, Tom Sherman, Kim Asendorf & Ole Fach, Rafaela Kino, Alex McLeod, Kate Wilson & Lynne Slater, Aleksandra Domanović, Systaime, Erik Zepka, Adam Ferriss, Rodell Warner & Arnaldo James, Debora Delmar Corp., Brenna Murphy, Nick Briz, Carlos Sáez, Jenn E Norton, Juliette Bonneviot, Luis Nava, Vince McKelvie, Claudia Maté, Evan Roth, Shana Moulton, Sabrina Ratté, Jordan Tannahill, Vasily Zaitsev feat. MON3Y.us, Ann HirschMert Keskin a.k.a Haydiroket, A. Bill Miller, Alix Desaubiaux, Krystal South, Rachael Archibald, Will Pappenheimer, Dave Greber, Chiara Passa, John Boyle-Singfield, Gunilla Josephson, Melanie Clemmons, Curt Cloninger, Terrell Davis, Morehshin Allahyari, Amy Lockhart, John Marriott, Lilly Handley, Emily Vey Duke, Kate Armstrong, Myfanwy Ashmore, Luke Painter, Aram Bartholl, Elena Garnelo, Lorna Mills, Ellectra Radikal, Nicole Killian, Jacob Chiocci, and Rick Silva.

Lorna Mills is a new media artist who is known for her digital animations, videos, and GIFs.  Her practice has included obsessive Ilfochrome printing, obsessive painting, obsessive super 8 film and video, and obsessive online animated GIFs incorporated into restrained offline installation work. She is a founding member of the Red Head Gallery and Persona Volare, and has curated numerous GIF-based exhibitions in Europe, Canada, and the US. She is represented by TRANSFER Gallery.

Lorna Mills Program Notes Episodes 1 and 2

Lorna Mills Program Notes Episdoes 3 and 4

On Suzan Pitt

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | October 14, 2015

This week we are thrilled to present the animated films of Suzan Pitt! I am excited to welcome SAIC art history graduate student Lara Schoorl to the blog.  Schoorl reflects on the psychosexual nature of Pitt’s films while describing their visually stunning style.

Suzan Pitt, image from Asparagus (1979).

Suzan Pitt’s films from the 1970s through the 2010s show us dream worlds, female desire, depression, sexual fantasies, the beauty of nature, and its destruction. They share with us a human lust for life that is both beautiful and annihilating. Influenced by Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung and the liminal spaces between dream and reality, consciousness and unconsciousness, inside and outside, Pitt’s films have a stimulating and layering effect, yet one that never reaches climax. Moments don’t end; instead, they hover and continue to begin. This evokes a feeling of being between waking and dreaming–never completely one or the other. This interstitiality is reinforced by Pitt’s quivering, hand drawn lines–characteristic of the techniques of cel and stop-motion animation she uses.

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October 15-The Animated Films of Suzan Pitt

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | October 9, 2015

Thursday, October 15 | Suzan Pitt will discuss her films via Skype. She will not be able to appear in person, as previously announced (we hope you still join us!). 

Suzan Pitt, still from Joy Street (1995). Courtesy of the artist.

Since the 1970s, Suzan Pitt has created some of the most acclaimed and influential independent animations of her generation. Best known for Asparagus (1979)—which screened with David Lynch’s Eraserhead (1977) on the 1970’s midnight movie circuit—Pitt creates lavishly hand-painted and stop-motion films of shape-shifting characters and meanings. A woman navigates a field of psychosexual vegetation, another finds salvation in an unlikely animated muse, and shadowy figures stalk a noir nightscape. Pitt introduces and discusses selection of films spanning her four-decade career via Skype, including Asparagus (1979), Joy Street (1995), Whitney Commercial (1973), Visitation (2011), and Pinball (2013). Prints courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.

1973–2013, USA, 35mm, 16mm, and HD video, ca 60 min + discussion

Suzan Pitt (1943) is a painter and animator. Her award-winning films have been exhibited around the world, including the Sundance Film Festival, New York Film Festival, London Film Festival, Ottawa International Animated Film Festival, Morelia International Film Festival, and the Image Forum Film Festival in Tokyo. The International Association of Film Animation (ASIFA) recently named her 1979 film Asparagus as one of the best animated films of the past half century. In addition to her short animations, Pitt has produced live film performances, directed music videos and spots for public television, and designed sets, costumes, and films for the State Opera Theater in Hamburg, Germany and the State Opera Theater in Wiesbaden, Germany. Pitt is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, three National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, and a Rockefeller Fellowship. She currently splits her time between Los Angeles and the upper peninsula of Michigan and teaches at the California Institute of the Arts.

Suzan Pitt Program Notes

On Louis Henderson

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | October 7, 2015

Tomorrow English filmmaker Louis Henderson will join us for his first Chicago appearance!   Video Data Bank‘s Lindsay Bosch blogs about Henderson’s references to the Internet and computing in his complex meditations on neo-colonalism and contemporary Ghana.  

Louis Henderson, still from All that is Solid (2014). Courtesy of the artist and the Video Data Bank.

Louis Henderson, still from All that is Solid (2014). Courtesy of the artist and the Video Data Bank.

Most of video art I watch, I watch on my laptop.  I dream of creating a perfect screening space—uninterrupted hours, big screen, dark room—but can never fully realize it in the rush of the day.  Of course, when I watch on my computer screen, the Internet is in the background, pulling me in and intruding on the images.  Messages pop-up, emails ding and news alerts assert themselves, pushing against my screening experience. The thump and whir of the world is always there, behind the screen, dragging me away. I feel guilty about this, knowing that my full attention is required, believing that I should be cut off from the world to view correctly.

When I first began watching Lettres du Voyant (2013) by Louis Henderson I was (as always) on my computer… Read more

October 8- Louis Henderson: Melts Into Air

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | October 2, 2015

Thursday, October 8 | Paris-based filmmaker Louis Henderson in person!

Louis Henderson, still from Letters du Voyant (2013). Courtesy of the artist.

Louis Henderson, still from Letters du Voyant (2013). Courtesy of the artist.

In his first Chicago appearance, award-winning director Louis Henderson presents a pair of films on the networked links between colonialism, computing, and capitalism in contemporary Ghana. In Lettres du Voyant (2013), a series of mysterious letters describe the practice of “Sakawa”—e-scams fortified by Western African religious rituals—and the possibilities it proposes for political resistance. Choreographed on Henderson’s desktop screen, All That Is Solid (2014) maps connections between the Cloud and its waste, layering ephemeral image searches, email, data, and notes over footage of the grinding physical labor of the massive Agbogbloshie electronic waste ground in Accra. Presented in collaboration with the Video Data Bank.

2013–14, France, HD Video, ca 60 min + discussion

Louis Henderson (1983, Norwich) is an English filmmaker whose research focuses on new materialities of the Internet and the neocolonialisation of cyberspace through planetary scale computing. He is a graduate of London College of Communication and Le Fresnoy–studio national des arts contemporains and is currently finishing a post-diplôme at the European School of Visual Arts. His work has been exhibited across Europe and the Americas, including at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, CPH:DOX, Transmediale, Muestra Internacional Documental de Bogota, The Centre Pompidou, FRAC Midi-Pyrénées, Louisiana museum of Modern Art, Tate Modern, and Whitechapel Gallery.

Louis Henderson Program Notes

On Wayne Boyer and Larry Janiak: Camera and Line

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | September 30, 2015

Tomorrow Wayne Boyer, Michael Golec, Associate Professor of Design History at SAIC, and Anne Wells, Collections Manager for the Chicago Film Archives (CFA) will join us at the Gene Siskel Film Center post screening for a round table discussion. This week Anne Wells of the CFA writes for us, reflecting on her personal relationship with the filmmakers as she also re-introduces and premiers their highly innovative and visually stunning work. 

Disintegration Line #2 (DL2) Larry Janiak, 1970.

Larry Janiak, still from Disintegration Line #2 (DL2), 1970. Courtesy of the artist and the Chicago Film Archives.

I first came to know Wayne Boyer and Larry Janiak through Chicago Film Archives’  Mort & Mille Goldsholl Collection, which contains over a hundred industrial films made by the Chicago-based design firm, Goldsholl Design & Film Associates. Both Boyer and Janiak worked for the firm in the 1960’s and played a significant role in shaping the look of their playful sponsored films. I didn’t get a full understanding of Boyer and Janiak’s fierce experimental vision for film until CFA acquired Janiak’s films in 2011 and Boyer’s in 2015.

Wayne and Larry share strikingly similar biographies. Both were born in Chicago (Wayne in 1937 and Larry in 1938), attended the same high school and college (Lane Tech High School and the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology), worked at the same Chicago-based design firm (Goldsholl Design & Film Associates), helped found an artist-run film co-op (Center Cinema Film Co-op) and went onto teach and develop art programs at Chicago universities (Wayne at University of Illinois at Chicago and Larry at IIT).

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October 1-Wayne Boyar and Larry Janiak: Camera and Line

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | September 25, 2015

Thursday, October 1 | Followed by a roundtable with Boyer, Michael Golec, Associate Professor of Design History at SAIC, and Anne Wells, Collections Manager for the Chicago Film Archives (CFA). Presented in collaboration with the CFA. 

Wayne Boyer, image from Drop City (1968).

Wayne Boyer, image from Drop City (1968).

Chicago at midcentury was home to a remarkable group of artists who bridged European modernism, pop, and psychedelia in brilliant personal and work-for-hire films. Among the most accomplished were Wayne Boyer and Larry Janiak, who trained at László Moholy-Nagy’s Institute of Design, worked for Morton Goldsholl’s design studio, and helped found the Center Cinema Coop, an important distribution collective. Both produced expressive and technically masterful films; Boyer’s explore visual abstraction through appropriation and in-camera effects while Janiak’s examine the inner life through direct animation and personal fragments of the everyday. This long overdue survey presents key works from the 1950s–70s and brings new insights to their achievements.

Featuring Faces and Fortunes (Goldsholl Associates, 1959), Drop City (Wayne Boyer, 1968), Disintegration Line #1 (Larry Janiak, 1960), The Building: Chicago Stock Exchange (Wayne Boyer, 1975), Adam’s Film (Larry Janiak, 1963), Agamemnon in New York (Wayne Boyer and Larry Janiak, 1964), George and Martha Revisited (Wayne Boyer, 1967, 8 min.), Disintegration Line #2 (Larry Janiak, 1970).

Followed by a roundtable with Boyer, Michael Golec, Associate Professor of Design History at SAIC, and Anne Wells, Collections Manager for the Chicago Film Archives (CFA).Presented in collaboration with the CFA.

1955–75, USA, 16mm and DCP, ca 70 min + discussion

Wayne Boyer (1937, Chicago) began making animated films as a teenager when he discovered that his father’s 8mm movie camera had a single frame release. He went on to study at the Institute of Design and, along with Larry Janiak, headed the newly formed filmmaking division at Morton Goldsholl Design Associates, an award-winning graphics and industrial design studio. In 1965 he was invited by the University of Illinois at Chicago to establish a photography, film and animation program in the School of Art & Design. During his tenure there, he established his own studio, producing public service, educational, and personal experimental films. He was part of Chicago’s early underground filmmaking community and a member of the Center Cinema Coop, an artist-run distributor for independent films. He is currently Professor Emeritus at UIC.

Larry Janiak (1938, Chicago) began making films as a student at Chicago’s Lane Tech High School. He studied at the Institute of Design and, along with Wayne Boyer, headed the newly formed film division at Morton Goldsholl Design Associates. Janiak left Goldsholl in 1968 for the Institute of Design, where he taught design animation and experimental filmmaking courses for 12 years. He played an active role in Chicago’s underground film community, helping to found Center Cinema Coop, an artist-run distributor of independent films, and a film workshop and screening space in Chicago’s Lakeview neighborhood. He devoted himself to spiritual practice in 1983 and lived at the Vivekananda Vedanta Temple and monastery until the early 1990s.

Wayne Boyer and Larry Janiak Program Notes

On Le Révélateur

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | September 23, 2015

I am delighted to welcome Natalia de Orellana back to the Conversations at the Edge blog (see her previous contributions here and here).  This week, she writes about Le Révélateur and the ways their audiovisual performances work on the senses.

Le Révélateur, image from live performance at Mutek, 2013.

Le Révélateur, image from live performance at Mutek, 2013.

In the audiovisual performances of Le Révélateur, sound and image are not in competition but in symbiosis, responding to and fulfilling each other. Video artist Sabrina Ratté and electronic musician Roger Tellier-Craig, who have worked together since 2010, find synchronicity in gesture, in pitch and in rhythm.

Le Révélateur, image from Mirages (2010).

Le Révélateur, image from Mirages (2010).

Spectator, you’ll be immersed into the depths of a virtual journey marked by loss and wonder.

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September 24-Le Révélateur

Posted by | Amy Beste | Posted on | September 21, 2015

Thursday, September 24Montreal-based video artist Sabrina Ratté and musician Roger Tellier-Craig in person!

Le Révélateur, still from AfterImage Selves (2014). Courtesy of the artists.

Le Révélateur is Montreal-based video artist Sabrina Ratté and musician Roger Tellier-Craig (Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Fly Pan Am). Using digital and analog tools, the two produce mesmerizing audiovisual performances of pulsing light corridors, abstract color washes, spaced out synths, and jump-cut rhythms—paying homage to the pioneers of electronic and computer art, while exploring entirely new dimensions. In this special program, the duo performs a new, long-form composition and screens a selection of Ratté’s short videos. Presented in collaboration with the experimental music series Lampo2011–15, Canada / USA, HD Video and live performance, ca 70 minutes

Le Révélateur (2008) has performed across North America and Europe, including the Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sonic Acts (Amsterdam), On Land (San Francisco), Mutek (Montreal), Mutek.Mx (Mexico City), Electric Fields (Ottawa), Micro Mutek (Barcelona), Suoni per Il Popolo (Montreal), Send+Receive (Winnipeg), Tone Deaf (Kingston), Sight + Sound (Montreal), and POP Montreal. Recordings are available on Gneiss Things, NNA Tapes, and Root Strata.

Sabrina Ratté (1982, Montreal) is a visual artist, mainly working in the field of video. Her work has been shown internationally, including the International Film Festival Rotterdam, Museum of the Moving Image, and Phillips’s inaugural Paddles ON! sale. She is part of the online collective Computers Club.

Roger Tellier-Craig (1975, Sorel, Quebec) is an electronic musician, whose musical past is profoundly rooted in Montreal’s underground scene, including iconic rock outfit Godspeed You! Black Emperor (which he left in 2003), Fly Pan Am, and Et Sans (with Alexandre St-Onge).

Le Révélateur Program Notes

FALL 2015 SEASON

Posted by | Ziva Schatz | Posted on | September 21, 2015

Le Révélateur, still from live performance at MUTEK.MX, 2012.

Le Révélateur, still from live performance at MUTEK.MX, 2012.

This is Ziva, the program assistant for Conversations at the Edge and we are excited to announce our Fall 2015 lineup!

The Fall season will start out with Le Révélateur which includes Montreal-based video artist Sabrina Ratté and musician Roger Tellier-Craig presented in collaboration with Lampo (9/24), Chicago filmmakers Wayne Boyer and Larry Janiak (10/1), English filmmaker Louis Henderson (10/8), animator Suzan Pitt (10/15), new media artist Lorna Mills (10/22), German based director and filmmaker Heinz Emigholz (10/29), Berlin artist Ming Wong (11/5), and L.A. based ‘conceptual entrepreneur’ Martine Syms, as well as SAIC’s own faculty member Claudia Hart (11/19).

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    About

    Conversations at the Edge is a weekly series of screenings, performances, and talks by groundbreaking media artists.

     

    CATE is organized by SAIC's Department of Film, Video, New Media, and Animation in collaboration with the Gene Siskel Film Center and SAIC's Video Data Bank, Conversations at the Edge is a dynamic weekly series of screenings, performances, and talks by groundbreaking media artists.

     

    Programs take place Thursdays at 6pm at the Gene Siskel Film Center (164 N. State / Chicago, IL / 312.846.2600), unless otherwise noted.



     

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